Wednesday, November 26, 2014

Bike Paths Mean Big Bucks for Indy, According to Rails To Trails Magazine and Me

Rails To Trails Magazine's Winter 2015 issue features a story by me on Indianapolis' bike infrastructure explosion and what it means financially to the city's businesses and residents. At the risk of revealing a major spoiler, it turns out lots of greenways mean lots of greenbacks.

Read it for yourself here: http://t.co/N9FgbvuKqm.

Tuesday, October 7, 2014

Finally ... I get my byline in Bicycling!

My New Year resolutions were pretty standard -- lose weight, train harder for race season, be a better husband and friend. But there was also one more item on the list, one that I'd wanted for years, but was never able to obtain -- bylines in the three most prestigious cycling publications.


With a bit of luck, I was able to tick off Bike and VeloNews. (I wrote the stories for their websites, but that's close enough for me.) The third publication -- Bicycling Magazine -- remained immune to my charms, pleas and attempts at bribery for most of the year. Luckily, persistence paid off, and you can find the fruits of my labor in the November 2014 issue.


Even better, I have two other pieces slated to run in the coming months. I couldn't be more excited.

Now I need to start thinking of my resolutions for next year. How about an article in one of those same three magazines each month?


Thursday, August 14, 2014

To all my former Star colleagues recently let go or having to reapply for their jobs


I feel for you. Just a few short years ago, I was called into my editor's office and told my services were no longer required. I was devastated. I had sunk so much of my life in my job, I had no idea what to do. I drove home in shock and promptly had a mini-nervous breakdown on Twitter. The next morning, I started sending out e-mails to all the local publications, offering up a scratched-and-dented reporter for sale at dirt-cheap prices. I also canceled my subscription.

Over the coming weeks, I had deadline withdrawal. I missed the rush of getting a breaking news story in at the last minute. At the same time, I was dealing with Gannett's HR department, which was trying to screw me out of my contractually obligated severance. Because how could they pay me the money I paid into my unemployment and let the former CEO Craig Dubow walk away with a $37 million retirement package? He had bills to pay, dammit!

Since then, I've managed to carve out a pretty decent career as a freelancer specializing in cycling and outdoor travel journalism. (Ironically, during every review session, I would plead with my editors to let me write some travel features, but to no avail.) I've traveled to France and around the U.S. -- often on other folks' dime -- and written about my adventures for hundreds of thousands of readers. I'm always working, but on stories I'm passionate about and truly enjoy. As I sit here typing on my computer wearing a T-shirt and shorts, I can honestly tell you I am much, much happier now than I ever was at the Star.

For all of you fucked over by the greed of Gannett yet again, be glad you're out. You no longer have to be constantly looking over your shoulder looking for the inevitable axe to fall. You don't have to listen to some corporate talking head talking about recasting the newsroom with an eye on the future. Because if you think this is the last round of layoffs, you are sorely mistaken. Gannett doesn't care about our community or quality journalism, it cares about profit. Nothing more. And they are going to continue to downsize staff until they have squeezed every last nickel they can from the Star's carcass.

The good ship USS Indianapolis Star is taking on water and sinking. When it finally goes down -- and it will go down -- everyone left on that ship is going to be caught in the suction. (Although by that time there will likely only be one employee left, regurgitating press releases and covering the party crasher beat.) You have been given a life raft; use it to paddle away from Gannett and toward a brighter future.

I apologize for any mistakes, grammar errors or misspellings in this long-winded post. I didn't have a copy editor.

Monday, March 17, 2014

Here Are The Fruits Of My NAHBS Labor For Bike Magazine

Tim and I flanking the best looking bike at NAHBS 2014.
I had a great time at the North American Handmade Bicycle Show this weekend. I showed off my gorgeous new Shamrock Cycles travel bike, met a lot of new friends, learned a lot about a bunch of new bikes and products, got to ride with some cool folks and managed to squeeze in a little work at the same time.



Here are the links to my stories for Bike Magazine:

http://www.bikemag.com/events/german-gearbox-makes-nahbs-splash-reeb-mountain-bike/

http://www.bikemag.com/events/student-bike-builders-turn-nahbs/

http://www.bikemag.com/events/highlights-north-american-handmade-bicycle-show/

Big thanks to my friends at Bike for letting me represent the magazine at the show.

Already looking forward to the 2015 show in Louisville!

Thursday, March 13, 2014

Covering NAHBS For Bike Magazine

As I type this, I'm sitting in a Charlotte, NC, Westin, overlooking the city. My friends at Bike Magazine asked me to cover the North American Handmade Bicycle Show, updating their online readers about all the cool mountain bike gear being introduced to the public this weekend. I'll also be hanging out at the Shamrock Cycles booth, talking about my gorgeous new travel bike that the incredibly talented Tim O'Donnell built for me.

If you see a middle-aged hipster with a long beard and Shamrock hat in Charlotte, flag me down and have me buy you a beer. I'd love to talk bikes with you.

My First Article For VeloNews Is Live!

I recently had the pleasure of working with Neal and Brian at VeloNews on a story about the incredible coaches and student-athletes at Marian University. You can read the piece here.

Although I hate bragging about my own work, I have to admit I'm really pleased with how the article turned out. But I think it owes less to my work as a writer and more to Marian Cycling Coach Dean Peterson's thoughtful, guiding hand and the tenacity and talent of his riders. Give it a read and let me know what you think.